by Robert Silverman, DC, MS, CNS, CSCS, CKTP, CES, CIISN, DACBN, HKC, SASTM

Environmental toxins are virtually everywhere. For instance, people don’t think too much about the packaging their food comes in, the contents of their shampoo, or even the air they breathe.

Yet, according to a 2010 article in Science70 percent to 90 percent of disease risks likely stem from environmental factors.

Environmental toxins come in two categories — chemical and metallic. These accumulate and reside in the body’s fatty tissues, and come from medications, food preservatives, and exposure to pesticides, air pollutants, and other harmful toxins.

While these toxins come from a variety of sources, initial exposure to them usually begins while a baby is still in the womb.

The six most widespread chemicals are:

  • Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), used as a flame retardant
  • Bisphenol A (BPA), found in plastic products (e.g., water bottles)
  • Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), found in nonstick cookware
  • Acrylamide in items cooked at high temperatures (e.g., french fries, fried chicken, and coffee)
  • Mercury, found in seafood
  • Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), a gasoline additive released in vehicle exhaust

For more information about Dr. Silverman, please visit www.drrobertsilverman.com.