For men, the lifetime risk of osteoporosis-related hip fracture is greater than the risk of prostate cancer.  In men, the slowdown is gradual and linear, beginning at about age 40

 

by Dr. Michael E. Greer, M.D

For men, the lifetime risk of osteoporosis-related hip fracture is greater than the risk of prostate cancer.  In men, the slowdown is gradual and linear, beginning at about age 40.

Remarkably, one in four men will have an osteoporosis-related fracture in his lifetime.  Sadly, they are less likely to know that they have osteoporosis until the disease is highly progressed – and they are less likely to receive appropriate treatment once they are aware of their condition. 

Fortunately, osteoporosis is both preventable and treatable with supplements and herbs.  They are also vastly preferable to bisphosphonates, which are neither safe nor appropriate for osteoporosis treatment.

Long-term use of oral bisphosphonates has been linked to poor bone quality and reduced mineral content and crystal size vs. a control group, with decreased axial strength and structural integrity. 

Bisphosphonates also are potentially destructive to the upper GI tract (mouth, esophagus, stomach, jawbone).  Even though bone strength appears to increase, local trials have found a 20% reduction in bone toughness (ability to endure bending pressure without breaking).

Maintaining a healthy skeleton is within reach.  Start early in life to put bone in the bank for later withdrawal.  Then follow a healthy diet of whole foods (1/3 raw) and regular resistance or weight lifting exercise.  Raw bone supplement consumption is also recommended.