On November 8, the Bravewell Collaborative awarded six “Pioneers” whose work in the 1980s and 1990s paved the way for a new era in American medicine.

On November 8, 2007, the Bravewell Collaborative awarded six “Pioneers” whose work in the 1980s and 1990s paved the way for a new era in American medicine.  The awards were presented at the Inaugural Pioneers of Integrative Medicine Award Event at the Grand Hyatt in New York City.  Each “Pioneer” received a cash award of $25,000 to recognize, empower and support his or her efforts in transforming the culture of healthcare.

The award recipients included: Larry Dossey, MD, James Gordon, MD, Jon Kabat-Zinn, PhD, Dean Ornish, MD; Rachel Remen, MD; and Andrew Weil, MD.

As part of its mission, the Bravewell Collaborative, a philanthropic foundation, supports physician leadership.  Since 2003, the Bravewell Collaborative has honored one leader bi-annually.  This year marks the first year the organization has selected six honorees.  Previous award winners include Dr. Ralph Snyderman, Former Chancellor for Health Affairs, Duke University Medical Center and Former President and CEO, Duke University Health Systems and Brian M. Berman, MD, director of the Center for Integrative Medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine.

The activities of the day included a lecture by each of the six distinguished honorees, including a luncheon, with the Dr. Mehmet Oz serving as Master of Ceremonies.  Each honoree discussed what they have learned about health and healing that changed their perspectives of medicine and what motivated them to change the way they practice medicine.

 Dr. James Gordon and Jon Kabat Zinn discussed their current work in mindfulness and mind-body healing through various transformative life-experiences.  Dr. Remen and Dr. Ornish brought powerful messages discussing how they faced their own personal health challenges that changed how they understood healing.  Dr. Weil and Dr. Dossey stretched the minds of the audience to envision a world of new medicine that might no longer be called “integrative medicine” but understood and practiced as “good medicine.”