Ashley Koff, R.D.by Ashley Koff, R.D., Founder, Ashley Koff Approved

The shocking news about the holidays is NOT the extra sugar we may consume, the shocking news is that sugar consumed during the holidays affects our health for the next 120 days. Yes you read correctly! That’s four months. That means the sugar we consume now impacts the health of our cells until April. And unfortunately, while added sugar can taste so sweet going in, it negatively adds up on the health front later (inappropriate inflammation, reduces immune health, creates unhealthy fat, etc).  So how can we enjoy the holidays but not experience Sugar Shock for the next few months? Here are some easy tips…Learn more >>

 

by Ashley Koff, R.D., Founder, Ashley Koff Approved

The shocking news about the holidays is NOT the extra sugar we may consume, the shocking news is that sugar consumed during the holidays affects our health for the next 120 days. Yes you read correctly! That’s four months. That means the sugar we consume now impacts the health of our cells until April. And unfortunately, while added sugar can taste so sweet going in, it negatively adds up on the health front later (inappropriate inflammation, reduces immune health, creates unhealthy fat, etc). So how can we enjoy the holidays but not experience Sugar Shock for the next few months? Here are some easy tips
 
1)      Choose your (added) sugar: did you know that most of the sugar we consume we do so without being conscious of it? Sure, the pumpkin pie oozes sugar but how about your yogurt, your coffee drink, your bread, even your salad dressing? Read labels – not just the nutrition facts but the ingredients too and look for words like “sugar” “cane syrup” and even “fruit concentrate” as sources of added sugar that may not need to be there.
2)   Choose better quality proteins and fats at every eating occasion: like hemp seeds and wild salmon, as these foods provide anti-inflammatory properties that will counterbalance sugar intake during the holidays.
3)   Have “no added sugar” day(s) the day after a daytime party or sugar shocking night out: reset your taste buds and protect yourself against too much sugar by focusing on avoiding most added sugar the day or two after you have sugar (and that includes extra alcohol or a sweetened alcohol beverage). Make sure to get in plenty of greens, lemons, quality proteins, fats and carbohydrates – yes you WANT the carbs, but the no sugar added ones and watch your portions. Use the FREE nutrition plan here as a guide (www.ashleykoffrd.com/nutritionplan )
4)   Rest up and get active: we crave sugar badly when our bodies are fatigued (physically and emotionally) so make sure to find moments to be active as well as moments for recovery.
5)    Assemble your food (and bring it to a party) more often: so much of the food we eat out contains added sugar (as a preservative) but our ‘some assembly required’ recipes at home would never call for adding spoonfuls of sugar. Making your food is a great way to reduce your sugar intake
6)   Just a spoonful of sugar… Mary Poppins got it right, the sweet stuff in small doses can be delicious but the song isn’t “Several spoonfuls of refined white sugar”. Pay attention to Quantity and Quality (organic please) and your body will recognize the fuel it’s getting, process it, and avoid irritation as well as contributing to fat storage.
 
Where is the most unexpected, strangest place you found sugar as an ingredient? Mine was in an “immune support” shot that someone sent me to try…um, hello?! Tweet me yours @ashleykoff