Broadcast live from the U of Minnesota, world-renowned experts and best-selling authors will address the importance of purpose and meaning in later life.

Register Now for AARP Positive Aging Conference, Minneapolis MN brought to you by the University of Minnesota on November 12, 2008

In 1900, life expectancy was just 47 years. Yet for people born in 2004, life expectancy is at 75.2 years for men and 80.4 for women. In 2005, 35 million Americans were older than 65, but this age group is projected to double by 2030, when one in every five Americans will be aged 65 or older. This growing number and proportion of older adults places never-before-experienced demands on our public healthcare system, including medical and social services. The aging of this generation will have profound effects on virtually every institution within our society: the workplace, family structure, housing options, home design, recreation, healthcare, and much, much more.

It is important to recognize that although the risk of disease and disability increases with age, poor health is NOT an inevitable consequence of aging. Clearly, healthy aging has emerged as a major public health issue – one that will ultimately affect each one of us. The choices we make today about our country’s public health priorities will set us on a course for eventual success or failure with regard to healthy aging.

That is why the Center for Spirituality & Healing at the University of Minnesota is hosting the Positive Aging Conference this November. With a goal toward advancing a national conversation around positive aging, this day-long conference will share important tools and resources to explore purpose, meaning and vitality in the second half of life. Broadcast live from the U of Minnesota, world-renowned experts and best-selling authors will address the importance of purpose and meaning in later life, as well as lessons for health and longevity learned from regions around the world.

The conference will feature experts and thought leaders including Richard Bolles, author of What Color is Your Parachute?; Richard Leider, author of Something to Live For and founder of The Purpose Project; Mary Jo Kreitzer, Director, Center for Spirituality & Healing; Harry R. Moody, Director, Academic Affairs for AARP; Dan Buettner, explorer, educator and author of The Blue Zone: Lessons for Living Longer from the People Who Live the Longest; and Joanne Disch, Director, Densford International Center for Nursing Leadership.