On September 10, 2012 the Archives of Internal Medicine included a study that may have locked in the value of acupuncture for chronic pain. The study, entitled Acupuncture for Chronic Pain: Individual Patient Data Meta-analysis, included a sterling the international team led by AJ Vickers with Claudia Witt, Karen Sherman, George Lewith and others. The team concluded: “Acupuncture is effective for the treatment of chronic pain and is therefore a reasonable referral option.

Meta-analysis of individual patient data on acupuncture for chronic pain drives significant positive media

On September 10, 2012 the Archives of Internal Medicine included a study that may have locked in the value of acupuncture for chronic pain. The study, entitled Acupuncture for Chronic Pain: Individual Patient Data Meta-analysis, included a sterling the international team led by AJ Vickers with Claudia Witt, Karen Sherman, George Lewith and others. The team concluded: “Acupuncture is effective for the treatment of chronic pain and is therefore a reasonable referral option. Significant differences between true and sham acupuncture indicate that acupuncture is more than a placebo. However, these differences are relatively modest, suggesting that factors in addition to the specific effects of needling are important contributors to the therapeutic effects of acupuncture.” The flurry of coverage, also international, included such sites a WEB MD and Medical News Today.  

 

Escape Fire opens across country, highlights Weil, Berwick, integrative medicine

The trailer to the documentary on the failing US healthcare system and what can be done about it opens with a face and voice quite familiar to the integrative medicine movement: Andrew Weil, MD. The movie, from top notch, award-winning documentary makers, is called Escape Fire: The Fight to Rescue American Healthcare. The documentary opened October 5, 2012. The next well-known face on the screen is former Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services director Donald Berwick, MD. A newsletter from the Samueli Institute notes that CEO Wayne Jonas, MD is also featured. The list of characters on the movies’ website also includes Dean Ornish, MD. Influential author Shannon Brownlee, who has written on over-treatment and the perverse incentives in the system, is also highlighted. 

Comment: Interesting that this came out within 3 weeks of Doctored,which also examines the mess of US healthcare. Here integrative medicine is presented as a voice for solution. “Doctored,” on the other hand, focuses on the complicity of the American Medical Association. Positive contributions, not of integrative medical doctors, but of the chiropractic profession, are highlighted.

Perhaps one day all of the integrative health vectors, from holism in medicine and nursing through chiropractic to patient-centered care to massage and yoga, may be brought forward in the same medium to name the value of this movement to shift the healthcare system. An LA Times review of Doctored is here. The movie will be featured at the upcoming Heal Thy Practice conference organized by Holistic Primary Care. HPC editor Erik Goldman calls it “a pretty right-on documentary that manages to get across some really important points w/o succumbing to partisan polemics. Please help us spread the word if you can.”  

 

Taylor Walsh seminars for Integrative Practitioner on social media in integrative practice

The Integrative Practitioner online community for integrative healthcare professionals is offering a series of seminars by Taylor Walsh on using social media in integrative practice. Walsh is the founder of Integrative Health and Wellness Strategies. His background includes a successful high tech start-up from the 1990s. He has recently consulted with the Samueli Institute and The Institute for Integrative Health. He is a columnist and adviser to the Integrator. The three down-loadable sessions are available for $59.

 

Report says NFL great Larry Fitzgerald uses Peter D’Adamo, ND’s genotype diet to extend career

A report in the Atlanta BlackStar on September 28, 2012 states that Larry Fitzgerald, the record-breaking receiver has turned to the genotype diet developed by clinician, researcher and author Peter D’Adamo, ND in order to “extend his career.” The 29-year-old Arizona Cardinals all-pro explains his decision to adopt the genotype diet: “The older you get, you start fine-tuning what works for you and what doesn’t work for you. You stick on the things that you know work and can help you have that longevity that you are looking for.” The writer notes that “as with most dieting fads, the [D’Adamo] routine has met its share of controversy as well as attracted a loyal legion of disciples.” Fitzgerald is clearly in the latter camp: “I think it makes me feel cleaner, not just body wise. I feel good. My energy levels are off the charts.”

Comment: D’Adamo has established a Center for Excellence in Generative Medicine, in collaboration with the University of Bridgeport Department of Naturopathic Medicine, where his ideas are being explored.

 

Research on naturopathic approach to diabetes gives that field significant positive attention in key diabetes publication

The 3 page feature in Diabetes Practice Options is entitled Naturopathic Care Can Enhance Diabetes
Patients’ Outcomes, Self-Management
. The side-bars are: “Research Shows Naturopathic Care Complements Usual Care for Diabetes Patients” and “PCPs Should Be Open to Patients’ Use of Naturopathic Providers, Researcher Says.” The articles feature lead researcher Ryan Bradley, ND, MPH, of Bastyr University, who partnered with Dan Cherkin, PhD, at Group Health Research Institute on the study which was reported out in April 2012. The positive report follows similarly positive coverage in an array of media, including MedicalNews Today, Diabetes Pro Smart Briefs, Huffington Post, and headlined articles in Yahoo and Google news.  

Comment: This study is a classic example of a profession advancing via quality research. Bradley and his team had the guts to proceed via the real world ambiguity of examining the whole practice of naturopathic medicine. Because reductionist researchers can’t pinpoint the cause of the success, this leaves single agent researchers with, as a colleague of mine likes to put it, “their panties in a bunch.” Instead, Bradley and Cherkin researched the way naturopathic doctors actually practice, using individualized multiple inputs that reflect their whole person approach. The result is the best press the naturopathic profession, as a profession, has ever received based on a researched contribution to human health.