by John Weeks, Publisher Editor of The Integrator Blog News & Reports University of Toronto integrative medicine program accepted into Consortium of Academic Health Centers for Integrative Medicine The Consortium of Academic Health Centers for Integrative Medicine has accepted the University of

by John Weeks, Publisher/Editor of The Integrator Blog News & Reports 

University of Toronto integrative medicine program accepted into Consortium of Academic Health Centers for Integrative Medicine

The Consortium of Academic Health Centers for Integrative Medicine has accepted the University of Toronto Center for Complementary and Integrative Medicine into its membership. The Center is developing plans for its program and is seeking a director. The planning is led by the institution’s vice provost, Sarita Verma, MD, JD, an international leader in interprofessional education and practice. Expectations for the program are here. The move brings to 54 the number of academic medical centers in the Consortium which spans the U.S. and Canada.

Study reports barriers to incorporation of CAM into family medicine residencies

The outcomes are hardly a surprise: a report led by Paula Gardiner, MD has found that “lack of time and a paucity of trained faculty are perceived as the most significant barriers to incorporating complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and integrative medicine (IM) training into family medicine residency curricula and training programs.” This is according to this article on the study carried out by researchers at the Boston Medical Center and published in Explore. In an interview, Gardiner advocated for more time via reference to the patient experience component of the Triple Aim: “This is a part of medicine that has significant impact on patient care. We need to minimize barriers to implementing CAM/IM curricula in order to address these competencies and promote a larger focus on patient centered care.” A “strong” CAM/IM program was characterized as one that “incorporated at least one of the following modes of exposing residents to CAM or IM: didactics, clinical rotations or electives.”

Comment: Chances are that a study of why there is a paucity of trained faculty would also find that a “lack of time” is at fault. Yet training up faculty to be excited about the importance of the content is likely the necessary step to creating the will that will in turn create the time for these clinicians to gain some fundamental sense of complementary and integrative philosophy and practices.

Accreditation group for homeopathy opens comment period for doctoral program standards

The Accreditation Commission for Homeopathy in North America (ACHENA) has opened a public comment period until December 15, 2013 on its Standards for the Doctoral Degree in Homeopathy. The draft standards are here. The 54 pages of the document detail 22 competencies in 5 domains: comprehensive clinical care (7); interdisciplinary and patient-centered communication (3); systems and context of care (2); research – analyzing, generating and using theories and evidence for homeopathic practice and scholarship (6); and leadership (4). The qualifications for core homeopathic faculty are: completion of certification equivalent to that provided by the Council for Homeopathic Certification; completion of a professional program in homeopathy; and five years of full time professional practice.

Comment: Good to see the homeopathic community continuing to engage formal self-regulatory and regulatory processes.

Midwifery Education Accreditation Council opens new website

Nationwide there are just 9 programs accredited through the US Department of Education-recognized Midwifery Education Accreditation Council  (MEAC).  This is just one factoid available on the new website of the accrediting body associated with the nation’s direct-entry, non-nurse and Certified Professional Midwives. 

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