US News headlines that “alternative medicine” is embraced by medical schools Medcal Schools Embrace Alternative Medicine. So reads the headline in the April 12, 2011 US News feature. Given 2nd paragraph visibility is the Institute for Functional Medicine (IFM). IFM’s

US News headlines that “alternative medicine” is embraced by medical schools
Medcal Schools Embrace Alternative Medicine. So reads the headline in the April 12, 2011 US News feature. Given 2nd paragraph visibility is the Institute for Functional Medicine (IFM). IFM’s executive director Laurie Hofman, MPH states that interest in teaching alternative approaches “has exploded, especially this last year.” The US News writer points to time constraints that limit integration of new content. She adds that the University of Arizona “will launch a 16-hour Internet-based holistic course on prevention and wellness, open to medical students from other schools.” In addition, “IFM will debut Web-based modules later this year on gastrointestinal health, the principles of functional medicine, and nutrition.” The writer then adds this aside: “Time constraints are no doubt the reason a recent study in Academic Medicine found that only 27 percent of medical schools currently meet the minimum target, set by the National Academy of Sciences, of 25 hours for class time about nutrition.” 

Comment: So, after a century of reports urging medical schools to beter value the role of nutrition in health, only 27% meet what is certainly, from an evidence perspective, less than minimum standard. These same institutions “embrace alternative medicine”? I don’t think so. Of course there are inroads. IFM and ACIM are cutting many. This article begs a key question: What does it feels like to embrace a porcupine, even one in velvet gloved needles?  

Job Opportunity: Director of Education sought by Institute for Complementary and Alternative Medicine at UMDNJ

Adam Perlman, MD, MPH sends a note that the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey is recruiting for a director of education for the Institute for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (ICAM). The person will be responsible for overseeing the educational activities for ICAM, including the Masters track in Integrative Health and Wellness.  ICAM is a University-wide initiative housed within the School of Health Related Professions at UMDNJ. The position is a full time faculty position. Masters Degree or PhD with experience in development, direction and assessment of education programs required.   Interested candidates should send a letter of intent and updated curriculum vitae to Dr Adam Perlman, c/o Margaret Rogers by email at rogersma@umdnj.edu.   

Two Opportunities: University of Kansas Medical Center Program in Integrative Medicine
The University of Kansas Medical Center, Program in Integrative Medicine has two positions open. Interested applicants can submit their resumes to jink@kumc.edu or call 913.945.6607.

  •  An experienced integrative MD/DO to join our clinic and be part of our rapidly expanding program assistant/associate professor level. Program offerings include nutrient infusions, active nutrition services with a teaching kitchen under the direction of an integrative nutritionist, neurofeedback, and a variety of laboratory testing options to guide recommendations. 
  • Applicants for the Program in Integrative Medicine fellowship year beginning in August 2011 through July 2012. The  is open to MD/DO physicians who have completed a primary care fellowship and are board certified or board eligible. A certificate from the University of Kansas Medical Center is awarded upon successful completion and a stipend is available for the year. The closing date for receiving applications is May 30, 2011 with the announcement of the selection in the beginning of June.

Educational program on environmental toxins from unused pharmaceuticals

Comment: I don’t typically cover courses such as this but felt that this is probably filling a gap in the education of many practitioners. Joel Kreisberg, DC sends notice of “an online continuing educational program designed to deliver high-quality curricula for medical professionals to help reduce the presence of unused pharmaceuticals in households and the environment.” The program is offered by GreenPharmEdu and offers three hours of unique curricula for physicians. The program is available free of charge for everyone. Continuing education credits are available for a nominal cost of $25. Marketing materials note that Ilene Ruhoy, MD, co-author of the firm states: “Concerns regarding pharmaceutical use are traditionally viewed as ending with the patient whether the symptoms improve, persist or deteriorate. Unfortunately, the unintentional results of a single prescription may have serious impacts on the health of children and teens.” Dr. Ruhoy argues “All primary care physicians should gain a basic knowledge of the risks and the solutions.
 


 Read other topics from the John Weeks’ May 2011 Round-up: