New York Times reports strange allies working to keep naturopathic doctors from licensing in Colorado A February 21, 2011 article entitled Colorado Faces a Fight over Naturopathy reports the rock and hard place that surround expansion of licensing of naturopathic

 

New York Times reports strange allies working to keep naturopathic doctors from licensing in Colorado

A February 21, 2011 article entitled Colorado Faces a Fight over Naturopathy reports the rock and hard place that surround expansion of licensing of naturopathic doctors. On the one hand, the Colorado Medical Association opposes licensing based on their view that diagnosis and treatment is beyond the ken of the naturopathic doctors.  On the other hand, a Colorado Coalition for Natural Health, led by individuals who have picked up their “Doctor of Naturopathy” diplomas through what were once called “mail-order schools,” oppose the NDs since the passage of a law would stop such poorly-trained people from hanging up their shingles and practicing as naturopathic doctors. One must appreciate the irony of the Colorado Medical Association defending the practice rights of mail order practitioners.  The Colorado Association of Naturopathic Doctors is leading the licensing effort.


Hospitals & Health Networks explores integrative health care in Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs)

Sita Ananth, MHA is co-author of ACOs and Integrative Healthcare, published online in early February for Hospitals and Health Networks, the American Hospital Association magazine. The cut-line of the column: “Integrative health care can help accountable care organizations (ACOs) reduce costs and improve health.” The authors reference a U.S. study of integrative health care that found that “clinical and cost utilization over a seven-year period showed a 60.2 percent reduction in hospital admissions, 59 percent reduction in hospital days, 62 percent decrease in outpatient surgeries and procedures, and 85 percent reduction in pharmaceutical costs when compared with conventional medicine alone.” [Though not directly cited, these data must be from this report from Alternative Medicine Integration Group, an Integrator sponsor.”]

Comment: The article may be as useful for those unfamiliar with ACOs as for its intended audience, those unfamiliar with integrative health care. I shared the article with Rick Branson, DC, a leader among chiropractic doctors in exploring the role of that profession in medical homes and ACOs. He states: “This is a good article to share with busy hospital admin folks as it is short and gets to the point.” Thanks to Dan Redwood, DC, for sending the link.  

ESPN’s absolutely scientific poll comes down in favor of pro sports teams “embracing yoga”

Those who receive multiple, daily pushes from Huffington Post will have had the opportunity on February 25, 2011 to waste some time by clicking into a piece called “5 Ridiculous ESPN Poll Maps.” These show ESPN viewer responses from different states on a variety of questions. One was: “Should more sports teams embrace yoga?” The overall response from this group of sports fiends and coach-potatoes:  by a 60-40 vote, yes.  ESPN watchers from Alaska, Delaware and Iowa were outliers in a majority from these states voting thumbs down on yoga.

Comment: First, the findings suggest that integrative health backer US Senator Tom Harkin (D-Iowa) still has some work cut out for him in his home state. Second, this note ranks as a 3rd significant endorsement of a distinct integrative practice in this Round-up. First, there is policy leader and HHS Secretary Sebelius, above, backing chiropractic’s vital role in the health system. Next, below, the Seattle-based delivery system Swedish Medical Center supports integrating the care of naturopathic doctors to better chronic disease treatment. Now, offering a patient-centered perspective (if “patient centered” extends to recommendations for the treatment that one’s televised sports companions should receive), the ESPN viewer backs yoga for athletes. Does this set of 3 studies mean we’ve hit a tipping point for integrative practices? 

 


Read more from John Weeks’ Round-up: