Nurse Trainings at VA Medical Centers LaunchedThe Samueli Institute  reported in its February 2011 newsletter that is has “launched the first in its series of four training programs in holistic nursing philosophy, theory and practice along with instruction in select complementary

Nurse Trainings at VA Medical Centers Launched
The Samueli Institute  reported in its February 2011 newsletter that is has “launched the first in its series of four training programs in holistic nursing philosophy, theory and practice along with instruction in select complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practices for almost 100 nurses from Veterans Administration Medical Centers in Long Beach and Los Angeles, Calif.” According to the newsletter, the trainings are one component of a larger study that it is testing in both military and civilian hospital settings. The project began last fall with an introduction to the concept of Optimal Healing Environments for each hospital’s administrative team meant to “demonstrat(e) its potential impact on patient safety, patient satisfaction and improved outcomes.” In the fall of 2011, the Institute will meet again with “both administrators and nurses …  to ascertain increased knowledge of the business case for creating healing environments, and increased comfort with knowledge and use of complementary medicine and other factors.”

Karan’s Urban Zen Integrative Therapists training accepting applicants 
Urban Zen Integrative Therapists (UZITs), a project led by philanthropist Donna Karan, is currently accepting new applicants for the 2011 program. Urban Zen describes the year long UZIT curriculum, which was developed in the context of an inpatient partnership with Beth Israel’s Department of Integrative Medicine, this way:   

“Students from the healthcare and yoga communities are trained in five modalities of treatment; yoga therapy (breath awareness, in-bed movement, guided meditation), Reiki, essential oil therapy, nutrition and contemplative care.  Each modality is introduced separately and then students are taught how to integrate the modalities to address whatever symptoms the patient or client is experiencing (pain, anxiety, nausea, insomnia, constipation (PANIC)). Once integration has been instructed, students begin their practical experience during their clinical rotation hours working with patients, loved ones and caregivers.  One hundred hours of such practice is required for certification.”

A six minute video from Urban Zen, including comments from patients, therapists and Beth Israel’s integrative medicine leaders Woodson Merrell, MD and Ben Kligler, MD, MPH, is here.

Seattle Swedish Hospital promotes MD-ND ties
Next to the University of Washington, Swedish Hospital is the dominant player in the Seattle healthcare market. On April 8, 2011, Swedish will host a one-day educational event entitled The Art and Science of Combining Naturopathic and Allopathic Medicine in the Clinical Setting. According to materials from the hospital, the sessions are “designed to open the lines of communication between allopathic and naturopathic health-care providers engaged in the prevention and management of chronic diseases.” The brochure further states that “improved communication between the two disciplines will enhance competency for health-care providers using traditional and/or alternative treatment methods in the prevention and treatment of heart disease, stroke, cancer, gastrointestinal disorders, and metabolic syndrome.”

Comment: This embrace of NDs as partners suggest that there may actually be a post-prejudice era of affirmative integration on the horizon.


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