Natural ProductsDietary supplement use by cardiologists, dermatologists and orthopedistsA study entitled Use of dietary supplements by cardiologists, dermatologists and orthopedists report of a survey found that 57% percent of cardiologists said they use dietary supplements at least occasionally, as did


Dietary supplement use by cardiologists, dermatologists and orthopedists
 

A study entitled Use of dietary supplements by cardiologists, dermatologists and orthopedists: report of a survey found that 57% percent of cardiologists said they use dietary supplements at least occasionally, as did 75% of dermatologists and 73% of orthopedists. Regular dietary supplement use was reported by 37% of cardiologists, 59% of dermatologists, and 50% of orthopedists. In addition, 72% of cardiologists, 66% of dermatologists, and 91% of orthopedists reported recommending dietary supplements to their patients. According to the summary, the “primary reason given for recommending dietary supplements to patients was for heart health or lowering cholesterol for the cardiologists; benefits for skin, hair and nails for the dermatologists; and bone and joint health for the orthopedists”.

The product most commonly reported to be used was a multivitamin, but over 25% in each specialty said they used omega-3 fatty acids and over 20% said they used some botanical supplements. Integrator reader Mitchell Stargrove, ND, LAc, author of Herb, Nutrient and Drug Interactions, comments on the report: “It’s great to see specialist MDs using nutrrients. They are working to expand their repertoire and respect patient’s choices; that should be the approach we all embrace with respect and collaboration. An intriguing question is whether they actually pay attention to interactions (beneficial and adverse) and quality issues? And, fundamentally, do they actually have a transdisciplinary strategy?’

Survey shows dietary supplement use in diabetics 

A survey on Use of complementary and alternative medicine supplements in patients with diabetes mellitus found that “regular use of one or more CAM supplements was reported by 34% of type 1 diabetics and 31% of type 2 diabetics.” The patients reported that prevention and improved well-being and quality of life were significant motivations to use CAM preparations. A focus of the researcher was on the use of cinnamon as a biological agent. Eighty-three percent of type 1 diabetics and 70% of type 2 diabetics said they had already heard of the postulated positive effect of cinnamon on blood glucose and diabetes. Women knew more about this than men. Some 85% of all the patients said they would be “willing, or probably willing, to test the effect of cinnamon on blood glucose and diabetes management.” This report came via HerbClip, a service of the American Botanical Council.