Review shares 25 windows on cost findings and business models in integrative practices in 2010A review of 2010 Integrator Blogs News & Reports content found an intriguing array of articles that directly relate to cost and economics issues. (See

 

Review shares 25 windows on cost-findings and business models in integrative practices in 2010 

A review of 2010 Integrator Blogs News & Reports content found an intriguing array of articles that directly relate to cost and economics issues. (See Cost and Economics of Integrative Healthcare in 2010: 25 Brief Articles.) Subjects include: a Medicare pilot with chiropractors; savings to the system from Duke’s personalized program; cost savings to insurers from patients using CAM practitioners in Washington state; huge benefits from direct access to chiropractors in Blue Cross Blue Shield of Tennessee; a new Medicaid integrative therapies pilot in Colorado; the new federal law on non-discrimination; inclusion of Ornish and Pritikin programs in Medicare; Sebelius’ views of complementary therapies; issues related to the business viability for licensed acupuncturists; savings through the whole practice of naturopathic care for Canada Post employees; trends in supplement and herb sales; savings from Allina’s in-patient integrative care program; massage practice trends in a down economy, and more. The two-dozen plus short articles are gathered here with links to primary sources.  

Comment: Cost is king in a capitalist economy. As I noted in my commentary on the mix of articles, the biggest question as the year draws to an end is whether costs will be elevated from its present invisibility in the draft NIH NCCAM 2011-2015 strategic plan’s “strategic objectives” when the final plan is unveiled in February 2011. How else can NCCAM fulfill on the charge in Section C of the mandate to: 

” … study the integration of alternative treatment, diagnostic and prevention systems, modalities, and disciplines with the practice of conventional medicine as a complement to such medicine and into health care delivery systems in the United States.”  


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