Council of Colleges of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (CCAOM) announces goals shaping their strategic planThe Council of Colleges of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine has 55 member schools representing some 8,000 students who are seeking to enter the workforce as licensed

 Council of Colleges of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (CCAOM) announces goals shaping their strategic plan

The Council of Colleges of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine has 55 member schools representing some 8,000 students who are seeking to enter the workforce as licensed acupuncturists. The Winter 2010 CCAOM newsletter lists the following priorities in its present strategic plan.

1. Promote AOM as a viable profession and healthcare option
2. Enhance graduate financial and professional success
3. Provide leadership on issues that impact member institutions
4. Promote the effective use of technology
5. Enhance faculty development and student learning

Comment: Pleasing to see #2 prioritized highly with #1. Executives in academia disagree about whether or not an educational institution needs to take responsibility for the state of the profession(s) into which they graduate students. My view is that the schools must be involved, especially if they are educating students for an emerging field, whether licensed acupuncturists or of integrative medical doctors, in which much participation is speculative. My position is part principle and part based on the realities that schools are the main aggregators of capital in these fields. The budgets of the professional associations pale.  

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NYCC promotes “integration” to attract students

New York Chiropractic College is using integration as a calling card for new students. In a website listing of reasons for why to choose NYCC, just after the standard “Academic Excellence,” web-surfing prospective enrollees will see “Integration.” Clicking on the word brings them to a special page that states that students at NYCC, which also has boasts a School of Applied Clinical Nutrition and the Finger Lakes School of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine, will:

  • “Gain the opportunity to work in collaborative settings with providers of mainstream medical therapies and scientifically supported alternative therapies
  • “Benefit from a holistic educational approach with shared emphases on the science, art and philosophy of chiropractic and Oriental medicine
  • “Experience integrated internship opportunities including NYCC’s own health centers, nationally renowned hospitals, Department of Defense sites and free-standing ambulatory care centers
  • “Discover our teamwork approach to integration – to create integral care, cooperation is needed between physicians, chiropractors, acupuncturists, massage therapists, and other practitioners
  • “Learn the knowledge and specialized skills to be part of a holistic circle of care, and modalities dedicated to the total wellness of patients.”

Comment:  I came across this page while working on a separate project. It occurred to me that anyone seeking to convince a stuck colleague that s/he can’t rightfully characterize the chiropractic profession as wanting to go it alone and in opposition to conventional medicine ought to be handed this statement of value from NYCC. While there remain holier-than-thou antagonists in some leadership positions in chiropractic academics and policy, what NYCC expresses here, and more importantly, increasingly practices, is an emerging strain. It’s ironic that the bull-headed, go-it-alone political power that earned chiropractic physicians a place in the VA and DoD has now created the opportunity for new students to be “part of a holistic circle of care.” Good for NYCC.

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Boucher Institute for Naturopathic Medicine seeks new president

The Boucher Institute of Naturopathic Medicine (BINM), Western Canada’s one accredited naturopathic medical school, is seeking a new president. BINM accepts a maximum of 36 students per new enrollment and currently employs 42 faculty members and 34 support staff. The job description notes responsibility for “overall leadership, management and direction of BINM” together with the ability to “create a conscious, caring, learning community consistent with the principles of naturopathic medicine.” while also “lead(ing) by example to encourage personal growth, individual responsibility, collaboration, holistic living and contemplative education.” The posting points toward an individual training as a naturopathic physician but does not require it. More information is available through boardchair@binm.org.

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