Professions   WHO publishes documents on benchmarking training for TCM, naturopathy, Ayurveda, othersHeather McLeod, an actuary and complementary and alternative health practices leader based in South Africa sends notice of 6 significant Benchmarks for training in traditional complementary and alternative

WHO publishes documents on benchmarking training for TCM, naturopathy, Ayurveda, others

Heather McLeod, an actuary and complementary and alternative health practices leader based in South Africa sends notice of 6 significant Benchmarks for training in traditional/ complementary and alternative medicine from the World Health Organization (WHO). The PDF-available documents cover training in these fields: Traditional Chinese Medicine, Naturopathy, Tuina, Unani Medicine, Nuad Thai, Osteopathy and Ayurveda. The WHO website on which they are published notes that these follow a 2003 resolution (WHA56.31) that “urges member states to formulate and implement national policies and regulations on traditional and complementary and alternative medicine to support their proper use.” The purposes of the benchmarking documents are as follows:

  • “Support countries in establishing systems for the qualification, accreditation or licensing of practitioners of traditional medicine;
  • “Support countries in establishing systems for the qualification, accreditation or licensing of practitioners of traditional medicine;
  • “Facilitate better communication between providers of conventional and traditional care, as well as other health professionals, medical students and relevant researchers, through appropriate training programmes;
  • “Support integration of traditional medicine into the national health system.”

Comment: My scanning plus early feedback from a few individuals in the field suggest that these WHO benchmarking documents are quality, respectful work. More specific commentary is welcome.

Certified Professional Midwives gearing for Medicaid inclusion push

After a victory in gaining inclusion in Section 2301: Coverage for Free Standing Birth Center Services in the new federal heathcare law, the Certified Professional Midwives (CPMs) are gearing up for a legislative drive to gain full inclusion as Medicaid providers. CPMs are home-birth focused midwives. The lead agency in the effort, which also drove the successful 2009-2010 lobbying, is the MAMA Campaign, involving all the field’s national organizations. The campaign’s website features a fetching video on the midwifery field. A notice from the organization stated that the new bill was to be introduced the week of November 29, 2010.
 

“Progress Report” on the acupuncture profession from education-accreditation leader Mark McKenzie, LAc

Individuals interested in a quick look inside the acupuncture and Oriental medicine (AOM) profession may find it useful taking a couple minutes with the Progress Report from Mark McKenzie, LAc, published in the December 2010 Acupuncture Today. McKenzie is the dean of the AOM program at Northwestern Health Sciences University and a commissioner for the Accreditation Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine. McKenzie honors what he believes have been his profession’s advances (organizations learning to work together; growing public interest) and notes some significant challenges (resources; practice viability). He rallies the troops toward greater involvement, a significant challenge in AOM. McKenzie closes: “Our training teaches us to consider the whole person when diagnosing and treating disharmony. Please keep this in mind as you reflect on the progress we have made as a profession, the challenges we have overcome and the future opportunities all of us will face.”
 

 

Battle over independent practice by non-MDs on display in column by George Lundberg,MD and reader comments

Former Journal of the American Medical Association editor George Lundberg, MD, presently editor of MedPages, offered a November 29, 2010 video commentary entitled Do Nurses Want to be Doctors? Lundberg was provoked by the Institute of Medicine’s report on the future of nursing in which vast expansion of independent practice by advanced practice nurses was strongly recommended. States Lundberg: “You nurse readers are going to love this report; many of you physician readers may not. It may curl your hair, in case you have any left.” Lundberg’s position is ultimately muddy, both bemoaning the day when the nation’s primary care is not principally by MDs and saying that if primary care is “saved” by nurses and others, “so be it.” He then proceeds to dub the nurses  “Noctors.”

Comment: Of more interest than Lundberg’s confusing remarks (he appears to be in an early stage of the change process in realizing it is time to shake the pernicious influence of guild) are the extensive comments his commentary provoked. One actually experiences the unleashed wave of nursing energy sweeping away the guild barriers to improvement that have held MDs in power. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation-funded IOM study has called the question on MD control of US healthcare. The battle is unfolding. It’s worth close tracking for all fields that are interested in expanding recognition and independent practice.  (Thanks to reader Mary Jo Kreitzer, RN, PhD for sending the link.)   


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